Cliff Savren reports for the Cleveland Jewish News on Israel and the Middle East from Ra’aana, Israel.

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I was relieved that Joe Biden won the presidential election – relieved for the United States, which, whatever your views about the president-elect, will surely be governed with a steadier hand, more professionalism and a more rational worldview. I was also relieved as an American Israeli.

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Israel is gradually emerging from its second COVID-19 lockdown, imposed after things began spiraling out of control here. The lockdown has brought the rate of infection down substantially and things are now being allowed to open up slowly. Schools remain closed, although preschools have been allowed to open.

The global coronavirus pandemic has accentuated the strengths and weaknesses of countries around the world. In the United States, the astoundingly high infection and death rates have highlighted not only the failures of leadership, but the irony that a country that is the world leader in medical research has failed to develop a coherent national policy to fight the pandemic.

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Shortly after my family and I moved to Israel from Cleveland, Benjamin Netanyahu was appointed finance minister and gained my grudging admiration, despite his right-wing foreign policy positions, for being willing to take decisive action on the economy, even though his approach was unpopular.

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Shortly after my family and I moved to Israel from Cleveland, Benjamin Netanyahu was appointed finance minister and gained my grudging admiration, despite his right-wing foreign policy positions, for being willing to take decisive action on the economy, even though his approach was unpopular.

Call me old-fashioned. There is something about a printed newspaper that reflects the place and time in which it was produced and that will never be captured quite as well in 50 or 100 years by looking at archived online internet articles about a historical event – such as the coronavirus pandemic of 2020. It will still be best reflected in the printed newspapers of the time, which will show researchers how normal life came to a halt – how there were still television listings in the paper, for example, but no movie listings, because the movie theaters were closed.

Call me old-fashioned. There is something about a printed newspaper that reflects the place and time in which it was produced and that will never be captured quite as well in 50 or 100 years by looking at archived online internet articles about a historical event – such as the coronavirus pandemic of 2020. It will still be best reflected in the printed newspapers of the time, which will show researchers how normal life came to a halt – how there were still television listings in the paper, for example, but no movie listings, because the movie theaters were closed.

Israel has changed tremendously in the 20 years since I moved here. A lot of the change has been the stuff of the daily news here, including three Knesset elections in less than a year, but other developments haven’t been noticeable at first and then there was a tipping point, when they seemed to burst into the forefront, even though they developed gradually.

Israel has changed tremendously in the 20 years since I moved here. A lot of the change has been the stuff of the daily news here, including three Knesset elections in less than a year, but other developments haven’t been noticeable at first and then there was a tipping point, when they seemed to burst into the forefront, even though they developed gradually.

Israel’s third Knesset election in a year, on March 2, is less than two weeks away. It’s difficultto have election fever under such circumstances. It’s not called a fever when it persists for a year. Critics of Israel’s electoral system would call it a chronic disease rather than a fever, but it’s not that either.