Cliff Savren reports for the Cleveland Jewish News on Israel and the Middle East from Ra’aana, Israel.

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Call me old-fashioned. There is something about a printed newspaper that reflects the place and time in which it was produced and that will never be captured quite as well in 50 or 100 years by looking at archived online internet articles about a historical event – such as the coronavirus pandemic of 2020. It will still be best reflected in the printed newspapers of the time, which will show researchers how normal life came to a halt – how there were still television listings in the paper, for example, but no movie listings, because the movie theaters were closed.

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Call me old-fashioned. There is something about a printed newspaper that reflects the place and time in which it was produced and that will never be captured quite as well in 50 or 100 years by looking at archived online internet articles about a historical event – such as the coronavirus pandemic of 2020. It will still be best reflected in the printed newspapers of the time, which will show researchers how normal life came to a halt – how there were still television listings in the paper, for example, but no movie listings, because the movie theaters were closed.

Israel has changed tremendously in the 20 years since I moved here. A lot of the change has been the stuff of the daily news here, including three Knesset elections in less than a year, but other developments haven’t been noticeable at first and then there was a tipping point, when they seemed to burst into the forefront, even though they developed gradually.

Israel has changed tremendously in the 20 years since I moved here. A lot of the change has been the stuff of the daily news here, including three Knesset elections in less than a year, but other developments haven’t been noticeable at first and then there was a tipping point, when they seemed to burst into the forefront, even though they developed gradually.

Israel’s third Knesset election in a year, on March 2, is less than two weeks away. It’s difficultto have election fever under such circumstances. It’s not called a fever when it persists for a year. Critics of Israel’s electoral system would call it a chronic disease rather than a fever, but it’s not that either.

I don’t think I was ever been in a room with so many brilliant people. It happened last week at a conference in Jerusalem, sponsored by the Israel Academy of Sciences and Humanities. I felt like a fly on the wall listening to the deliberations because the audience at the two-day event was mostly made up of other conference speakers.

On Nov. 21, Israel Attorney General Avichai Mendelblit announced the filing of criminal charges against Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu for fraud, breach of trust and bribery in three government corruption cases. Never has a sitting Israeli prime minister been indicted. If he is convicted of bribery, he would almost certainly go to jail.