DeWine 1/12

Ohio Gov. Mike DeWine during a Jan. 12 press conference. 

Hospitals throughout the state will have to finish vaccinating their medical personnel by 11:59 p.m. on Jan. 17 so they can begin vaccinating those who are 80 years or older, Ohio Gov. Mike DeWine said during a Jan. 12 press conference.

If a hospital does not want to follow that plan, they will be asked to return their vaccinations to the state.

About 85% of nursing homes in the state have been visited by vaccine providers and given the opportunity to receive the vaccine. DeWine said that population was a priority as majority of coronavirus deaths have been Ohioans older than 65 years old.

Ohioans who are 80 years old and older, which number about 420,000 people, will be able to receive a vaccine starting Jan. 18. The state expects to receive around 100,000 vaccines next week for this age group.

The state anticipates vaccinations will open up to those 75 years old and older on Jan. 25; Feb. 1 for those 70 and older; and Feb. 8 for those 65 and older.

The Area Agencies on Aging will be available for those 65 years and older who have questions about the vaccine and to connect people with providers. For more information, visit aging.ohio.gov or call 1-866-243-5678.

Also the week of Jan. 25, vaccinations will be available to those with severe congenital, developmental, or early-onset medical disorders. An announcement is expected in the coming days on how those individuals will be able to receive their vaccinations if they choose.

Local health departments, emergency management agencies and providers in each county will release where and how people can be vaccinated later this week.

Each provider will decide what the process at their location will look like, which could include walk-up clinics and scheduled appointments.

The state has approved about 800 locations where residents can receive a vaccine next week. More providers will be added when more vaccines are available to the state.

On Jan. 14, the Ohio Department of Health will post information on coronavirus.ohio.gov about what providers are being allocated vaccinations for next week. Residents will be able to search by ZIP code and by county.

The site will only show which providers have been allotted vaccines. It will not update in real-time.

President Donald Trump's administration will free up vaccines that have been held back, DeWine said.

The administration has been holding back vaccines ensure the supply chain was reliable. DeWine said he didn't know when the state will receive the vaccines but called the move a "welcome change."

Ohio has had 792,938 total cases of COVID-19 and 9,802 total deaths, the Ohio Department of Health reported Jan. 12.

The number of reported cases increased by 7,981 from Jan. 11.

The individuals who have tested positive range in age of less than a year to 111 years old; the median age is 43.

The total number of individuals who have been tested in Ohio is 8,225,635. The daily percent positivity of confirmed laboratory tests is 13.2%, with a seven-day moving average of 13%, according to data from Jan. 10. 

The number of reported deaths in Ohio increased by 100 from Jan. 11. The median age of those who have died is 80. 

The ODH reports 41,863 cumulative hospitalizations, and 6,237 individuals have been admitted to the ICU due to the coronavirus. The median age of those hospitalized is 67.

The number of COVID-19 hospitalizations reported in the last 24 hours is 486, with 49 ICU admissions. There are currently 4,010 patients hospitalized with the coronavirus – 968 are in the ICU, and 638 are on ventilators.

The ODH reports 648,724 individuals are presumed recovered – defined as cases with a symptom onset over 21 days prior who are not deceased.

Franklin County accounts for 93,903 of the cases, 3,203 hospitalizations and 702 deaths.

A total of 321,506 Ohioans have received the first dose of the COVID-19 vaccine as of Jan. 12. 

If you have questions regarding COVID-19, call 833-4ASKODH (833-427-5634) or visit coronavirus.ohio.gov.

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